Episode 4: Can you be your authentic self at work?

Can you be your true self at work? What would it be like to feel open, authentic and vulnerable at work? Is focusing on happy workers altruistic or exploitative, and is training people to create inner change an easy get-out for bad employers?

In this episode, we bring in David Papa: spiritual coach, leadership consultant and founder of Love & Profit. We start off by finding out about how he works with leaders to bring their ‘higher selves’ to work – a self that is more loving, vulnerable and open. Join us as David kindly shares with us his thoughts about how change is always possible from within, and about how we always have a choice to be happy.

But wait! Do we always have a choice, or is this easy to say for people lucky enough to have those choices? Is it really fair to talk about changing our mindsets if we are in a horrible situation? Listen and let us know what you think!

Listen here! : http://thewayweconnect.buzzsprout.com/160260/677553-episode-4-happiness-and-authenticity-at-work 

Resources:

David mentioned Martha Beck and her “shackles on or shackles off” test, a way to test with your gut or higher self what you really feel about a decision.

He also referenced the book The Happiness Advantage by Shawn Achor, a popular book that highlights the benefits of happy employees. However, Gwen countered with the book The Happiness Industry: How Government and Big Business Sold Us Well-Being by William Davies.

Another book mentioned was Reinventing Organizations by Frederic Laloux, with the quote: Workplaces have traditionally encouraged people to show up with their “professional” self and to check all other parts of themselves at the door. They often require us to show a masculine resolve, to display determination and strength, and to hide doubts and vulnerability. Rationality rules: the emotional, intuitive, and spiritual selves are typically unwelcome, or out of place”. The link here leads to an online platform and free resources about creating authentic, enlightened workplaces. (Gwen: I LOVE the book and the examples!)

David discussed Victor Frankl and his book A Man’s Search for Meaning. Frankl was a holocaust survivor who wanted to look at how some people thrived in seemingly hopeless situations. He went on to found logotherapy, a form of existential psychotherapy. 

And finally, we briefly touched on Brené Brown and her work on vulnerability. Her research shows that the happiest, most ‘whole-hearted’ people are those who are not afraid to show some vulnerability and weakness. She also writes some beautiful stuff about courage!